Workers Beware of Social Media Posts

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

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Whether students are currently advancing their education at schools in Alberta or have already landed a job with a new employer, they need to be careful about their social media image. According to a CNN survey, 70 percent of business managers have decided not to hire a candidate after finding something out online, and as the number of social media sites grows, the number of potential online problems does as well.

Watch What Is Posted
While most people think that their personal views cannot affect their working situation, that right is only extended to issues regarding human rights or employees in a unionized environment. Those in the private sector are at the discretion of their employer, and can potentially be fired for expressing an opposing viewpoint or posting something which causes a revelation of character, CBC News reports.

"The vast majority of people believe that what they say outside of the workplace is none of the employer's business," David Doorey, an associate professor of labour and employment law, told CBC News. "But that's not true. The employer can always fire you for whatever you say. The only issue again is whether you're entitled to some sort of notice before you're fired."

Although the situations are largely judged on a case-by-case basis, the overarching theme is that professionals need to be wary of what they post on the internet. Any non-unionized employee can be terminated with reasonable notice for any reason, so long as their human rights are not violated in the process. This may be a daunting concept, but any potential issues can be avoided by keeping a private profile whenever possible and self-censoring what is posted online.

Use Social Media for Good
Employees don't have to completely eliminate social media platforms from their life. Setting up professional pages on websites such as LinkedIn or Twitter can help to extend a worker's personal brand and network with others. They can also aid in maintaining contact and relationships with past coworkers, employers or teachers, which may come in handy for future recommendations or employment opportunities. These tools also help aspiring employees find job openings or meetups that could help them land a job.

Students who wish to find a career in the legal industry can start by enrolling in legal administration courses at Reeves College. To find out more information, fill out the form on the right


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